Dispensationalist Theology

by Boris & Uskovic

supported by
/
  • Digital Album
    Streaming + Download

    Includes unlimited streaming via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.
    Purchasable with gift card

      €1 EUR  or more

    You own this

     

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

about

How does god relate to man? It’s with utmost pride that Dream Machine releases an album that pushes the boundaries of experimentalism: Boris & Uskovic are actually no one else but Cemon Victa, here in pursuit of exploring all the possibilities outside the confines of the hardcore genre. The conceptual framework is one of biblical interpretation that actually fuels Christian fundamentalism. If you’re up for mood music, fragile atmosphere and sonic radicalism, this is for you:
Immerse yourself in the minor piano tune and orchestral buildup of the “Prologue”, the minimalist noise exploration of “The Meeting” and the surreal distortion of “The Investigation”, before “The Discovery” adds noise and rhythm, strangely organic and incoherent, resounding from a post-industrial wasteland. “The Solution” combines subtle breakbeats with neoclassical structures and choirs, while “The Conflict” is merely cold and dead, lifeless and chilling. “Travelling to Answers” is a short soundtrack-like piece, followed by three tracks that feature actual rhythm: Downbeat and quirky (“The Agreement”), chiptune-style nervous (Why does it happen?”) or big beat broad band with 303 sounds with lovingly reproduced vinyl crackling (“No Protection”), it’s all there. “The Dreamer” is a disposal for half-rotten and almost entirely decomposed hardcore beats, the title track features neuroactive drumming and “Unhappy Ending” is, what do you think, rather unhappy, bleak, with a lead-heavy, slow and distorted rhythm.
“Dispensationalist Theology” convinces through a remarkable attention to detail and flawless sound design. One for the demanding music lover who is capable of active listening – he shall be generously rewarded, brothers!

credits

released July 24, 2014

license

all rights reserved

tags